Books

A Shakespearian Grammar: An Attempt to Illustrate Some of the Differences between Elizabethan & Modern English

A Shakespearian Grammar An Attempt to Illustrate Some of the Differences between Elizabethan Modern English The finest and fullest guide to the peculiarities of Elizabethan syntax grammar and prosody this volume addresses every idiomatic usage found in Shakespeare s works with additional references to th

  • Title: A Shakespearian Grammar: An Attempt to Illustrate Some of the Differences between Elizabethan & Modern English
  • Author: Edwin A. Abbott
  • ISBN: 9780486431352
  • Page: 260
  • Format: Paperback
  • The finest and fullest guide to the peculiarities of Elizabethan syntax, grammar, and prosody, this volume addresses every idiomatic usage found in Shakespeare s works with additional references to the works of Jonson, Bacon, and others Its informative introduction, which compares Shakespearian and modern usage, is followed by sections on grammar classified according tThe finest and fullest guide to the peculiarities of Elizabethan syntax, grammar, and prosody, this volume addresses every idiomatic usage found in Shakespeare s works with additional references to the works of Jonson, Bacon, and others Its informative introduction, which compares Shakespearian and modern usage, is followed by sections on grammar classified according to parts of speech and prosody focusing on pronunciation The book concludes with an examination of the uses of metaphor and simile and a selection of notes and questions suitable for classroom use Each of than 500 classifications is illustrated with quotes, all of which are fully indexed Unabridged republication of the classic 1870 edition.

    • A Shakespearian Grammar: An Attempt to Illustrate Some of the Differences between Elizabethan & Modern English Best Download || [Edwin A. Abbott]
      260 Edwin A. Abbott
    A Shakespearian Grammar: An Attempt to Illustrate Some of the Differences between Elizabethan & Modern English

    About "Edwin A. Abbott"

    1. Edwin A. Abbott

      From Biography Base Edwin Abbott Abbott December 20, 1838 1926 , English schoolmaster and theologian, is best known as the author of the mathematical satire Flatland 1884.He was educated at the City of London School and at St John s College, Cambridge, where he took the highest honours in classics, mathematics and theology, and became fellow of his college In 1862 he took orders After holding masterships at King Edward s School, Birmingham, and at Clifton College, he succeeded G F Mortimer as headmaster of the City of London School in 1865 at the early age of twenty six He was Hulsean lecturer in 1876.He retired in 1889, and devoted himself to literary and theological pursuits Dr Abbott s liberal inclinations in theology were prominent both in his educational views and in his books His Shakespearian Grammar 1870 is a permanent contribution to English philology In 1885 he published a life of Francis Bacon His theological writings include three anonymously published religious romances Philochristus 1878 , Onesimus 1882 , and Sitanus 1906.More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk 1886 , Philomythus 1891 , his book The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman 1892 , and his article The Gospels in the ninth edition of the Encyclop dia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world He also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles 1898 , Johannine Vocabulary 1905 , Johannine Grammar 1906 Flatland was published in 1884.His brother, Evelyn Abbott 1843 1901 , was a well known tutor of Balliol College, Oxford, and author of a scholarly history of Greece.

    614 Comments

    1. Written by the man who wrote Flatland, this book not only helped me understand Shakespeare better, but now reading the King James Bible is a cakewalk.


    2. This is not an easy book It is technical I feel that having read this volume I have a better understanding of the works of Shakespeare that I have already read, and a firmer foundation to continue my quest to read all of Shakespeare s works.


    3. Anyone trying to read Shakespeare or watch the plays should read the Introduction to this book, which explains the general reasons for the differences between Elizabethan and modern i.e Victorian English The body of the book is very detailed, and would interest someone with an interest in language rather than the general reader Since Elizabethan English is transitional between Middle English Abbott uses the term Early English, and Anglo Saxon for Old English and the modern language, the book oft [...]


    Leave a Comment